Posted on Leave a comment

How to Finish Reading a Book a Week

Penguin with books

A Guide to Making the Goal Happen

Reading a book a week is easy. All you have to do is open a different book on each Sunday and read a page. You’ve read the book or at least a portion of it. Finishing a book a week can be a little more difficult. Still, it’s far from impossible, and if you’ve set this as a goal for yourself, you can achieve it, and it will be easier than you think.

There are a couple of things you need to realize about this goal. It’s your goal. Whether you make it or not, you’re only accountable to you. There’s no reason to get distraught if you’re not completing your goal. Life happens. There are important things that happen and may come as a surprise. Hopefully, they are good surprises that distract you from the goal. If they are not, simply push through the difficult times and get back on track as soon as you can. Finishing a book a week should be considered the average over a certain time period. If you don’t finish a book one week, you may be able to finish two books the next week to compensate.

What’s Your Motivation?

Stephen King said, “If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time or tools to write.” As a writer I recognize the importance of reading to my art, craft, and work. If you’re not a writer, you may have other reasons to accomplish the book a week goal. You need to know what these reasons are. Do you want to be able to brag about your reading? Do you want to improve your compassion? Do you want to delve into the classics or become a specialist in an area? Do you just want to be smarter and have things to talk about with other people? Knowing your motivation will help you choose the books you’re motivated to read.

What Is a Book?

The first thing you need to do is decide what “a book” is for your goal. Are you going to count everything in the book section of your local bookstore? Are comic books magazines or are they books? Do graphic novels count? What about children’s books and novelty books? You’re in charge, so you get to decide what counts as a book and what doesn’t. Personally, I count graphic novels and children’s books. Graphic novels allow me to see how stories are visually presented, and they allow me to consume a different genre than I may otherwise. They also allow me to catch up on reading if I get behind.

There’s nothing wrong with children’s or picture books being a part of the equation. You can learn a lot from the books in the children’s section because they are written at a child’s level, and they generally stir clear of any political agenda. With a children’s book, you either get a non-fiction just the facts type of book, or get you get a gentle story that will improve your mood and outlook.

Children’s books are often the first place I go when I want to learn about a new subject. They are entertaining and easier to understand. The bonus is that many children’s books are cheaper than non-fiction books written with more jargon and larger words, which means if I’m not sure that I want to know more about a subject, I don’t have to invest a lot of money to find out. Young adult books are another good source to go to for quick reads with a lot of pages.

Do Audiobooks Count?

This is your goal. If you want to count, audiobooks, you can. It’s entirely up to you. When I first started, I was big into audiobooks, but my goal was to finish reading them. So, I kept track of the audiobooks I finished and how much time I spent listening to them, but I did not count them toward the number of books I finished reading. You totally can, though.

What’s Your Genre?

What genre do you love to read and read the fastest? My niece reads a lot of dystopian fiction, and she burns through them at a rapid pace. I tend to read fantasy at a breakneck speed. I get bogged down in nonfiction books and collections of short stories because there’s no thread of a story to pull me through. Chances are that you’ll read your favorite genre faster than you read others. If you know what it is, you can choose those books when you need to boost your speed or the number of pages read. You probably don’t want all of your books to be in that genre, but it depends on why you’re setting yourself the goal of reading a book a week.

Set a Baseline

Since 2010, I have finished a book a week every year on average. In that first year, the books I read had an average of 221 pages each. I was going to college for an Early Childhood Education degree, so that helped. But this first year was just a baseline for me. With all goals, you should try to get better. In 2019, my average book was 261 pages. Every year, I set the goal at just one more page than the last year. In 2015, I missed my goal, but I made up for it at the end of 2016.

In order to set up a baseline, you want to keep track of the books you read, and I suggest, the number of pages. There’s a temptation just to go down to the children’s section of the library, sit down for four or five hours and read 52 picture books. Goal accomplished! However, do you really want just children’s books on your list when you’re done with the goal?

How Many Pages Can You Read?

Another baseline, you want to consider is how fast can you read. I read about a page a minute, which is faster than my mom but super slow compared to my niece. However, this isn’t to compare myself to them; knowing how fast I read, in general, allows me to understand roughly how many pages I can finish in an hour. The reality is that I finish between 48 and 60 pages an hour depending on a variety of factors and variables. At the end of the week, if I’m close to finishing a book, I can set aside the extra time to get it done based on how many pages are left and how quickly I read.

What Counts as a Page?

You get to choose what counts as a page. For me, I read the introductions and prefaces of all the books, even when those pages are notated with Roman numerals and won’t count toward my final goal. I tend to skip bibliographies and reference notes, unless they provide additional information. That means the book will end at “The End” or when the last complete sentence is written. However, I will count the About the Author page as part of the numbered pages, especially if there isn’t anything in between it and the story but a blank page or two. The big thing here, though, is you don’t want to overthink it. (Too late, right?) It’s your goal; you choose how the page count is going to work for you. You could even leave page counts out all together; I just find them motivating.

Choose the Books

Once you’ve set the goal, you need to choose your books. You don’t have to get all 52 books at once; though, if you’re setting this goal, you probably have a to be read pile somewhere. I suggest picking up four or five to start with. Go to the independent bookstore and choose the newest books if you’re looking for conversation starters, or go to the used store and get some classics if you want to beef up your cultural knowledge. If you know what minimum page count per book you want to achieve, choose only books that are bigger than that. You can also go to the library depending on your book reading speed and check out the books, but remember to return them on time. Better yet, check to see if your library has a selection of books you can buy.

Do the Actual Reading

Now, you have to do the actual reading. There’s no magic bullet. There’s no secret sauce. If you want to accomplish your goal, there are no shortcuts. You have to do the reading. If you want to get fit, you have to exercise. If you want to play the violin better, you have to practice. If you want to save money, you have to cut your expenses. If you want to read a book a week, you have to make the tie to read.

Fortunately, one rule will help you accomplish the goal: ABAB. Always bring a book. It doesn’t matter where you’re going or how long you think you’re going to be there, bring a book. If you end up having to wait for someone or something, or your car breaks down, you’ll have an opportunity to read. If you’re going to the dentist’s or doctor’s, take a book. Going to meet the principal of the school? Take a book. Is your computer updating? Don’t watch the bar; read a book. Even if something happens, your eyes will notice the lack of movement (and some of those updates take forever). Going to work? Take a book. You can read it on your lunch hour (or half hour) and on your 15-minute breaks. Paperbacks are good for this. Stick them in your bag and bring them with you.

Once you have ABAB working in your favor, you will still need to set some time aside every day to read. Most people will choose to read before going to bed. However, some will find it easier to get the day’s reading done in the morning. If you set aside an hour, you’ll be golden. Be sure to turn off the phone, turn off the computer, and go to a good place to read where you won’t be distracted by your electronics and their communications.

You can take ABAB a step further and always have a book handy. (I’d make an acronym of that, but it doesn’t read as well: AHABH.) If you have a pet that likes to sit in your lap, you can cuddle with them and still get some reading done. My dad does a lot of reading in the bathroom. Having a pile of books on the nightstand next to the bed is good, having books in the kitchen, near the couch, and wherever else you tend to spend your time is better.

Chances are you’re going to have to cut something out. For me, it was magazines. I like to read them; I think they have good information. I have one magazine subscription that I swear I’m going to get to. Those are stacked up a decade high. (I will read them one day!) I don’t read them because I haven’t figured out how to get them to count toward the goal. I thought about moving to a straight page goal rather than book goal, but that seems like too much work.

If you’re like most people you binge watch your favorite shows. Stop it. Instead, watch one episode and then reward yourself by reading a book. You’ll spread out the enjoyment of the show while also getting your reading done. YouTube is another time waster. Do you really need to see another cat video or a makeup artist doing whatever it is they do? Do you need to watch another review about movies coming out that no one has seen or the reactions to their trailers? There’s some wonderful, informative, entertaining content on YouTube, but like Netflix, you should binge watch it. Don’t go down that rabbit hole!

What games do you play on your phone? Candy Crush, Farmville, Match 3… Whatever you play, is it adding to your life or just wasting time? Do you pull up the game because you have nothing better to do? Get your book out and use that time to read: a sentence, a paragraph, a page or whatever you can instead of wasting time with the game, you can waste it with a book. If you have five minutes to watch a video or play a game, you have five minutes to read.

Stop driving! Unless you’re counting audiobooks and listening to them in your car, which I don’t recommend because it can be a distraction, you spend a lot of time in your car doing nothing but driving. (Hopefully, driving is a complicated task and it should be the only thing you do in the car.) Take the bus or public transit. I get it. In most places in the U.S., the public transit system is terrible, but you can make it work for you. Once you know the route, you can read at the bus stop while waiting and on the bus while it’s getting to your stop. The same applies for a light rail system. Side benefits include not dealing with road rage or other dumb drivers, saving money on gas and other car-related expenses, and improving the environment.

We all do things out of habit that aren’t good for us or take time away from our day. If you can find those things that you do without thinking about it that are time wasters, you can eliminate them. It might take some examination, but you can become more efficient and gain more time for yourself and for reading. Small steps are the key to accomplishing great things.

More than One at a Time

You should try to read more than one book at a time. This may seem counter-intuitive, but consider this. You have a goal of books that are 240 pages or more. You read about 30 pages a day. You’ll finish your first book in eight days and be a day behind in your reading.

If you’re able to read the same book at 25 pages per day and a second book at 5 pages a day, you’ll finish your first book in 10 days, and you’ll have read 60 pages in your second book. This reading habit will allow you to read larger books that will reduce the overall number of pages you need to read per book, without slowing you down too much. If you can keep books in different places, you’ll be able to read more variety and get more out of your goal. Paperbacks are great for travel. Larger books can stay at home.

Keep a Record

When you’re finished with a book, write it down and keep a record. I use an excel spread sheet. It contains the position in which the book was finished, the title of the book, the date finished and the number of pages in the book. I used to make notes about the book, like series and subject, but I’ve given that up. You can always read a book twice. Classics are great for that, especially “A Christmas Carol.”

Additional Motivation

Your local libraries probably have an adult reading program with prizes. Free stuff for reading? Yes, please. They usually happen during the summer, so go down in mid-May and ask about it. The best part is that they often require you to read different genres, which will allow you to get out of your comfort zone and explore new books. Some local bookstores offer the same type of deal. You don’t even have to buy books from them. A book club, where a group of people gets together to discuss a book on a weekly or monthly basis could also provide you with extra reasons to read. Reading is more than fundamental; it’s the key to improving imagination, being more compassionate, and ensuring freedom. But you don’t have to take my word for it:

At Lincoln City Archery, we support independent authors. In addition to a collection of books on archery, we have a wide variety of books written by self-published writers. These are books that you generally wont’ find in larger bookstores that rely on publishing house distributors. Many of our books are written or edited by local authors (including the range leader at our location).

At Lincoln City Archery, we provide archers the opportunity to increase their knowledge of traditional archery and practice their skills at our indoor archery range in Lincoln City, Oregon. Like traditional archery, reading books takes focus and concentration. Turning off your electronics and reading a book for an hour will improve your focus and concentration. If the story is good enough, it won’t even seem like practicing. Plus, it’s a great way to pass the time when you can’t make it to the range. Happy shooting, happy reading, and let’s get on target.

Posted on Leave a comment

‘And Death Followed Behind Her’ Book Review

Penguin with books

And Death Followed Behind Her” (affiliate link) starts with the apocalypse having gone on for a couple years already. The only survivors are those who, like Katrina, have and keep a will to live. She faces zombies, demons, three-headed dogs, imps and minotaurs. However, not all of the evil creatures are actively evil. Some just want to play video games and stay out of Hell. How can anyone fault them for that?

When Katrina has finally had enough, she teams up with those closest to her. But can a demon, two mortals, a zombie and a wingless angel end the apocalypse? With echoes of the movie “This Is the End,” the first book in “And Death Followed Behind Her” is a fast-paced adventure with plenty of adult situations and language and a little less laughter. Katrina is a beguiling character whose honesty, willpower, and snark, rub many people, demons, and zombies the wrong way.

A quick read, “And Death Followed Behind Her” is a compilation of three “Katrina Hates” stories adapted from Nohelty’s own graphic novels. Nohelty creates a new tale that Hollywood should be desperate to get its hands on. Until Hollywood finds it, you can get it at Lincoln City Archery, on Amazon (affiliate link), and at Nohelty’s own website.

Indie Authors at Lincoln City Archery

At Lincoln City Archery, we have a wide variety of books written by self-published writers, including my own. These are books that you generally wont’ find in larger bookstores that rely on publishing house distributors. Many of our books are written or edited by local authors (including the range leader at our location).

At Lincoln City Archery, we provide archers the opportunity to increase their knowledge of traditional archery and practice their skills at our indoor archery range in Lincoln City, Oregon. Like traditional archery, reading books takes focus and concentration. Turning off your electronics and reading a book for an hour will improve your focus and concentration. If the story is good enough, it won’t even seem like practicing. Plus, it’s a great way to pass the time when you can’t make it to the range. Happy shooting, happy reading, and let’s get on target.

Affiliate links used in this article allow us to earn a small commission on your book purchase while costing you nothing. Thank you. If you would prefer to order your books directly from us, we will be happy to ship them directly to your home for $3 plus shipping if they are available.

Posted on Leave a comment

Why I Wrote the Adventures on the Amur

Penguins with the Adventures on the Amur

While living in Blagoveshchensk, Russia, I ran into a number of things that were amusing. Some I didn’t understand; some were just interesting. The two books in the Adventures on the Amur series (affiliate link) were explanations for me to understand the history of the area in the first, and a cultural moor in the second.

Every time I’ve visited a new country, I’ve had to adapt to the local culture. Sometimes, I’ve just had to accept the way things are. After all, I wasn’t going to change a whole culture overnight, or even in a couple of years. Others, I’ve had to fight against, like boofing in Africa during my stint in the Peace Corps (affiliate link to “My Life in the Peace Corps”).

The Treasure of Nikolai Nikolaevich

The first thing that piqued my curiosity was the fact that China gave Russia access to the Amur River, which allowed its river towns and shipping to reach Vladivostock. This important concession made it much easier for Russia to move supplies from inland to the coast and vice versa. When I did some research, I found out that the treaty was negotiated by Nikolai Nikolaevich Muraviov-Amursky, a man who many Russian bureaucrats at the time thought was too young to be governor over such a large mass of land.

How did he negotiate the treaty? What did he say to the Chinese to give their largest rival in the area access to the Amur River? The people I asked didn’t have an answer, and the only book that I saw, which could contain the answer was about six inches thick, written in old-style Russian, and in the local museum. So, I came up with my own story: The Treasure of Nikolai Nikolaevich.

The Curse of the Golden Kopeck

Growing up, I was always told, “See a penny pick it up and all the day, you’ll have good luck.” I would pick up coins all the time, and I was good at spotting them. When I went to Russia and found a 50-kopeck piece on the ground, my wife was appalled that I picked it up. She told me to throw it down and not to pick up coins. I didn’t understand why until someone told me about the magic that can be used with coins. The second in the Adventures on the Amur is loosely based on the Russian superstition of coins on the ground.

I wrote the Adventures on the Amur in the style of the Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew mysteries with a little touch of Indiana Jones. Come to Lincoln City Archery, and I will be happy to sign them. Or order them online at Amazon (affiliate link).

Lincoln City Archery and Books

At Lincoln City Archery, we have a wide variety of books written by self-published writers, including my own. These are books that you generally wont’ find in larger bookstores that rely on publishing house distributors. Many of our books are written or edited by local authors (including the range leader at our location).

At Lincoln City Archery, we provide archers the opportunity to increase their knowledge of traditional archery and practice their skills at our indoor archery range in Lincoln City, Oregon. Like traditional archery, reading books takes focus and concentration. Turning off your electronics and reading a book for an hour will improve your focus and concentration. If the story is good enough, it won’t even seem like practicing. Plus, it’s a great way to pass the time when you can’t make it to the range. Happy shooting, happy reading, and let’s get on target.

Affiliate links used in this article allow us to earn a small commission on your book purchase while costing you nothing. Thank you. If you would prefer to order your books directly from us, we will be happy to ship them directly to your home for $3 plus shipping if they are available.

Posted on Leave a comment

Book Review: Ranger’s Apprentice: the Ruins of Gorlan

Books with archery themes

I added the first three books of the “Ranger’s Apprentice” series to our inventory because a couple of people came into our store and said that the series is what got them into archery. Written by John Flanagan, “the Ruins of Gorlan” follows Will and Horace as they become apprentices to a ranger and at the Battle School, respectively. The two boys are wards of the state along with two girls, who become apprentices in other areas of the castle. The book is a quick and enjoyable read.

Because the story centers on Will and Horace, the women are relegated to ancillary characters with little more to do than provide vague love interests and the opportunity to enjoy some good cooking. It’s clear that this first story is for and about boys. (If you want more female-centric stories, I recommend “Longbow Girl” and the “League of Archers” series.)

The emotional power surprisingly comes from Horace’s development and how he interacts with Will. The two boys provide the feel-good moments and the suspense. For traditional archers, there is plenty to enjoy, including a shooting exercise that few archers engage in.

Overall, the “Ruins of Gorlan” hits its target. It provides a nice get away from today and allows the spirit of adventure, fun, and suspense to engulf the reader in simplistic storytelling that ignites the imagination.

In addition to a collection of archery-themed books, we have a wide variety of books written by self-published writers. These are books that you generally wont’ find in larger bookstores that rely on publishing house distributors. Many of our books are written or edited by local authors (including the range leader at our location).

At Lincoln City Archery, we provide archers the opportunity to increase their knowledge of traditional archery and practice their skills at our indoor archery range in Lincoln City, Oregon. Like traditional archery, reading books takes focus and concentration. Turning off your electronics and reading a book for an hour will improve your focus and concentration. If the story is good enough, it won’t even seem like practicing. Plus, it’s a great way to pass the time when you can’t make it to the range. Happy shooting, happy reading, and let’s get on target.

Affiliate links used in this article allow us to earn a small commission on your book purchase while costing you nothing. Thank you. If you would prefer to order your books directly from us, we will be happy to ship them directly to your home for $3 plus shipping if they are available. You can even have them gift-wrapped!

Posted on Leave a comment

Kyodo: the Philosophy of Japanese Archery

Lincoln City Archery Penguin Logo

In Japan, archery is considered the first martial art. However, when the Japanese military removed archery from its quiver to make room for guns, archery’s popularity in the country fell. The way of the bow had to change to survive. Kyodo became more than a way to protect the country; it became a way to protect your serenity and sanity. The Japanese took a war practice and re-invented it to help people find their inner peace. The practice of Kyodo emphasis form over goal with the knowledge that “right shooting results in a hit” (“Target” by Jerome Chouchan).

Each shot is separated from every other. Your last shot doesn’t matter. Forget about it, go into your form and take your shot. Don’t think about the shot to come. Only this shot matters. This arrow is the one that counts. There is no other arrow before or after it. Clearing your mind and allowing your body to work with your mind and eyes is something foreign to many people in the west. Rather than control the arrow, we must let it flow from our practiced actions and a place of trust.

While “Target” claims to be a book about business, it is also a book about life. Pick it up at Lincoln City Archery or on Amazon (affiliate link) and take your archery practice to a different level.

In addition to a collection of books on archery, we have a wide variety of books written by self-published writers. These are books that you generally wont’ find in larger bookstores that rely on publishing house distributors. Many of our books are written or edited by local authors (including the range leader at our location).

At Lincoln City Archery, we provide archers the opportunity to increase their knowledge of traditional archery and practice their skills at our indoor archery range in Lincoln City, Oregon. Like traditional archery, reading books takes focus and concentration. Turning off your electronics and reading a book for an hour will improve your focus and concentration. If the story is good enough, it won’t even seem like practicing. Plus, it’s a great way to pass the time when you can’t make it to the range. Happy shooting, happy reading, and let’s get on target.

Affiliate links used in this article allow us to earn a small commission on your book purchase while costing you nothing. Thank you. If you would prefer to order your books directly from us, we will be happy to ship them directly to your home for $3 plus shipping if they are available. You can even have them gift-wrapped!

Posted on Leave a comment

How to Shoot a Bow and Arrow Available for Preorder

How to Shoot a Bow and Arrow book cover

When I was first learning how to shoot a bow and arrow, I had a checklist. I went from my feet to my knees to my hips and shoulders, and only when my body was in position would I worry about the bow. Of course, my instructor gave me a good-natured ribbing as I went through the mental list in a not-so-subtle manner, but it was the only way I could remember most things. (Stupid back elbow.)

After opening Lincoln City Archery, I released many of the people who do 15-minute sessions with us or buy a bow from us could use a book to help them remember what they learned in their time on our range. I know I could have used it to help me learn everything better. People have different learning styles, but even those who don’t remember best from reading can use the reinforcements that come from the digesting of information through books.

“How to Shoot a Bow an Arrow” is available for preorder at Amazon as an eBook. (Those who prefer paperbacks can order from this website.) The book is about 80 pages long. It goes through the process of getting your body, bow and arrow into position so you can shoot successfully in a traditional manner. Traditional archery is a good exercise for the body, and it will help you find a quiet place in your mind. As you start your archery journey, this book will help you remember what your body already knows. Preorder “How to Shoot a Bow and Arrow” today.

Posted on Leave a comment

Oregon Author Signing Books at Lincoln City Archery: Press Release

Lincoln City Archery Penguin Logo

For Immediate Release

Media Contact: Shad Engkilterra

                                503-409-8037

                                Shadexaminer@gmail.com

Lincoln City Archery Press Release

Lincoln City, OR (Nov. 12, 2021) – Lincoln City Archery will host Oregon Author T.M. Brenner on Saturday Nov. 20 from 11am to 1pm and Sunday Nov. 21 from noon to 2pm. Brenner will be meeting with fans and signing copies of his books, including “Luminaries,” the Clandestined trilogy and the Sky Child trilogy.

Lincoln City Archery and Brenner are celebrating the release of his latest book, “The Pan-Galactic Misadventures of Dick Blowhard.” Released on Oct 2, 2021, Dick Blowhard is a genre-mashing tale of bar fighting with unicorns, galaxy traveling with space battles, and cursed toys that come to life. The comedy, sci-fi, fantasy adventure features adult comedy, so reader beware. Those who enjoy “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” will love Brenner’s new offering.

“When Brenner came to shoot with us and told me he was an indie author living in the Portland area, I knew we needed to feature him for a weekend book signing,” said Lincoln City Archery Owner Shad Engkilterra. “Indie authors produce some of the most original work out there, and Brenner is a prime example of that.”

Lincoln City Archery features a selection of independent author books at its indoor archery range and retail store at the Lincoln City Outlets. These are books that are generally not found in larger book retailing establishments.

“With so many people screaming for originality in TV and movies, it’s important to support those that are creating those new stories,” said Engkilterra. “It’s hard for those voices not connected with already successful IP or a media conglomerate to find the space to make some noise.”

Brenner is a graduate of Portland State University with a degree in Computer Science. He has written eight books. Brenner can be reached through his online presence:

Email: tmbrennerbooks@gmail.com
Website: http://www.tmbrenner.com
Facebook: Author T. M. Brenner
Twitter: @TimothyMBrenner

For those unable to make it to the book signing, T.M. Brenner’s books are available at Amazon (affiliate link).

Posted on Leave a comment

Rod Serling on Going Home Again

Penguin with books

Every time I read something by Rod Serling, I think, “My God, that man knew how to write.” When I read the memoir penned by his daughter Anne Serling, I thought “that man knew how to love his family.” He may have worked too hard, smoked too much, and spent a lot of time thinking about the ills of society, but he found a way to make it work for him.

In the book Night Gallery with stories based on the TV series, Serling explores several of his favorite story-telling motifs. “They’re Tearing Down Tim Riley’s Bar” examines the idea that a man can’t go home again. After 25 years of service, Randy Lane is on the verge of losing his job to a back-stabbing assistant. As he descends into acceptance of the situation, with the help of copious amounts of alcohol, he takes part in hallucinations that come from his memories of 1945, the best year of his life. Lane learns that a man can’t go home again, but if he is lucky, his memories and friends from now will help him find a way back to the present, so he can live a more fulfilling and satisfying life.

Rod Serling is a gift to us as human beings. Find his stories and devour them. And then try, with a mighty effort, to live up to them. We’ll all be better for it.

At Lincoln City Archery, we provide archers the opportunity to increase their knowledge of traditional archery and practice their skills at our indoor archery range in Lincoln City, Oregon. Like traditional archery, reading books takes focus and concentration. Turning off your electronics and reading a book for an hour will improve your focus and concentration. If the story is good enough, it won’t even seem like practicing. Plus, it’s a great way to pass the time when you can’t make it to the range. Happy shooting, happy reading, and let’s get on target.

Affiliate links used in this article allow us to earn a small commission on your book purchase while costing you nothing. Thank you. If you would prefer to order your books directly from us, we will be happy to ship them directly to your home for $3 plus shipping if they are available. You can even have them gift-wrapped!

Posted on Leave a comment

Legends in Archery: Adventures with Bow and Arrow book review

Lincoln City Archery Penguin Logo

When the Civil War ended, Confederate soldiers had their weapons confiscated. As combatants for the South, brothers Will and Maurice Thompson returned their demolished home without a way to hunt. They turned to the bow and arrow, and it was lucky for archery enthusiasts everywhere that they did. The brothers were writers, who published their adventures in magazines and later books. Maurice’s The Witchery of Archery is credited with reviving interest in the sport of bowhunting at a time when the rifle was considered a superior weapon.

Their story is just one of those told in in a collection of short vignettes by Peter Stecher. Legends in Archery: Adventures with Bow and Arrow explores the pioneers of modern-day western bowhunting. In addition to the Thompson brothers, he covers Howard Hill, Fred Bear, and many others while focusing on their bowhunting achievements. There are plenty of photos with their kills. There is also some discussion centered on the idea that big game couldn’t be taken with a bow and arrow.

While Stecher’s ramblings occasionally interrupt the biographical notes of the hunters in his book, overall, he provides and entertaining read. Because the author is Austrian, he also includes a couple of Austrian archers near the end. If you want a quick orientation to the fathers of the return to western traditional archery, Stecher provides a great place to start.

Legends in Archery is available at Lincoln City Archery and through this affiliate link on Amazon. At Lincoln City Archery, we provide archers the opportunity to increase their knowledge of traditional archery and practice their skills at our indoor archery range in Lincoln City, Oregon. Like traditional archery, reading books takes focus and concentration. Plus, it’s a great way to pass the time when you can’t make it to the range. Happy shooting, happy reading, and let’s get on target. (We use affiliate links in this article to earn a small commission on your purchase while costing you nothing. Thank you.)

Posted on Leave a comment

ASL Interpreter and LGBTQI Author Drue M. Scott Will Sign Books at Lincoln City Archery (Press Release)

Drue M Scott author of "The Monster in Blackwood Forest"

Lincoln City, OR (May 13, 2021) – From May 29 to 31, 2021, Lincoln City Archery will host author Drue M. Scott, whose new release is the third in the Mortal Choice series set in the fictional town of Blackwood Forest, Oregon. Scott’s Mortal Choice series has found resonance within the Deaf community for its heroine Jinx, who is a werewolf and happens to be deaf. Her best friend Christian is gay.

Originally, Scott had intended to explore what happens when a Deaf girl changes into a werewolf, and how that change would affect her hearing. He was also interested in exploring the dynamic between the werewolf and her gay best friend, who doesn’t know she’s a lycanthrope. The story follows more than the two characters Scott had envisioned in its first phases, and Oregon plays its own role.

“I love the Pacific Northwest: the smells, the sights, the mountains and rivers, and the ability to drive a short amount of time and be in the wilderness. I wanted a place far enough removed from the hustle of city life but still attached enough to be open-minded, mostly. A place that could easily harbor some close-mindedness but not be without hope for making the world better,” said Scott. “I really wanted my fictional town to be cool, damp, beautiful, and not too far from the rocky coast of the Pacific; Oregon was the perfect place to create Blackwood Forest.”

The Mortal Choice series has been called cinematic in scope and, with its werewolves and fairies, it compares favorably to “Twilight.” Those who are looking for a new twist on old themes will definitely enjoy Scott’s stories.

“This series is unique because it takes some of the typical mythologies of supernatural beings and beasts and looks at them through a different lens,” said Scott. “The Mortal Choice series takes place in a rich environment full of things the reader will find familiar, but done in a fresh new way.”

Scott will be at Lincoln City Archery on May 29 from 4pm to 7pm, when he will give a talk on “Inclusivity in Fiction” in the evening. On May 30, he will be available to sign books from noon to 4pm, and on May 31, he will be in town to sign books from 11am to 1pm. Hours may be expanded due to popularity.